Wednesday, October 5, 2022

Can Ticks Give You Lyme Disease

Must read

Signs And Symptoms Of Lyme Disease

How to avoid ticks and Lyme disease in Michigan

Many people with early symptoms of Lyme disease develop a circular rash around the tick bite. The rash:

  • usually develops around 3 to 30 days after you’ve been bitten
  • is often described as looking like a bull’s-eye on a dart board
  • will be red and the edges may feel slightly raised
  • may get bigger over several days or weeks
  • is typically around 15 cm across, but it can be much larger or smaller

Some people may develop several rashes in different parts of their body.

Around 1 in 3 people with Lyme disease won’t develop a rash.

Some people with Lyme disease also have flu-like symptoms in the early stages, such as:

  • tiredness

Remember to tell them you’ve been bitten by a tick.

How To Avoid Getting A Tick Bite

You might be at risk if you live, work in, or visit a wooded area, or an area with tall grasses and bushes .

You may also be at risk if you are involved in outdoor activities such as hiking, camping and gardening.

You may be bitten by a tick and not even know it.

Heres what you can do to avoid getting a tick bite.

What If A Tick Bites My Dog

The more ticks in your region, the likelier it is that your furry pal will bring them home.

Your dog is much more likely to be bitten by a tick than you are. And where Lyme disease is common, up to 25% of dogs have had it at some point.

About 10% of dogs with Lyme disease will get sick. 7-21 days after a tick bite, your dog might seem like theyâre walking on eggshells. They also might have a fever and enlarged lymph nodes. Plus, they might seem tired. Dogs also get antibiotics for Lyme.

What if my dog brings ticks into my home?

Use a tick control product on your pet to prevent Lyme disease. Also, have your dog vaccinated against Lyme.

Check your dogâs whole body each day for bumps. If you notice a swollen area, see if thereâs a tick there. If you find a tick, wear gloves while you use tweezers to separate it from your dog. Then, put it in soapy water or alcohol, or flush it down the toilet.

Use alcohol to clean the spot on your dog where the tick was attached. Keep an eye on that spot, and also on your dog to make sure theyâre behaving normally. If you notice any changes, check with your vet.

Show Sources

John Aucott, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine director, Johns Hopkins Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center.

CDC.

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: âVital Signs: Trends in Reported Vectorborne Disease Cases — United States and Territories, 2004-2016.â

American College of Rheumatology.

You May Like: Coldwell Banker Old Lyme Ct

Can Lyme Disease Be Treated

In most cases, yes. Antibiotics can effectively treat Lyme disease, especially when treatment begins early. Cases that reach the later stages of the disease, however, can be difficult to treat and some symptoms can persist.

PHAC reports that removing the tick within 24-36 hours usually prevents infection.

What Should You Do If You Find A Tick

Ticks and Lyme Disease
  • Don’t touch the tick with your bare hand.

  • Use a pair of tweezers to remove the tick. Grab the tick firmly by its mouth or head as close to your skin as possible.

  • Pull up slowly and steadily without twisting until it lets go. Don’t squeeze the tick, and don’t use petroleum jelly, solvents, knives, or a lit match to kill the tick.

  • Save the tick. Place it in a plastic container or bag so it can be tested for disease, if needed.

  • Wash the bite area well with soap and water and put an antiseptic lotion or cream on the site.

Read Also: Can You Prevent Lyme Disease After A Tick Bite

What Can I Expect Long Term If My Child Has Lyme Disease

If Lyme disease is caught and treated early, most children will make a full recovery. Some children with Lyme disease go on to experience what’s called a post-infectious syndrome with symptoms that may include feeling fatigue, joint aches and pains, headaches, difficulty sleeping, and problems concentrating. Since the infection itself is gone by this time, doctors generally don’t prescribe antibiotics. Each child is different, but it’s not uncommon for symptoms of post-infectious syndrome to linger for months, or even years, and they can be made worse by stress or other illness. But most children do make a full recovery.

Blacklegged, or deer, ticks are very small, so it helps to know what to look for when doing a tick check. Adults are about the size of sesame seeds and in the nymph or larva stage, they can be as tiny as a poppy seeds.

I Found Out It Was A Deer Tick That Bit Me What Should I Do Now

If a deer tick bit you, one dose of an antibiotic called doxycycline can prevent Lyme disease if:

  • you live in an area where there is a lot of Lyme disease
  • the tick was probably attached to you for more than 36 hours
  • the tick was removed in the last 3 days

Doxycycline should not be given to pregnant or breastfeeding women or to anyone allergic to doxycycline. If a tick bit you, ask your doctor if you should take doxycycline to prevent Lyme disease.

Is there anything I should look for after a tick bite?

After a tick bite, be on the look-out for signs of infection. The first sign of Lyme disease is usually a gradually enlarging, round or oval red discoloration of the skin surrounding the bite. The rash is usually neither painful nor itchy. Once the infection spreads, the same rash can be seen on other areas of the body. Other symptoms of infection may include:

  • facial droop
  • fever
  • body aches.

Late manifestations of Lyme include swollen joints, and rarely neurologic problems like severe headaches. Lyme at any stage is treatable with a set course of antibiotics, typically two weeks and rarely more than a months duration.

Read Also: What Is Early Stage Lyme Disease

Preventing Tick Bites And Lyme Disease

There are several easy ways to protect yourself from an encounter with Lyme-transmitting ticks:

  • Steer clear of areas that are known to have an infestation of ticksâlike tall grasses and leaf piles.
  • If hiking in the outdoors, stay in the center of the trail.
  • Wear protective clothing, like long-sleeve shirts, pants tucked into your socks, and appropriate shoes.
  • Remove and inspect your clothing before and after moving through a high-risk area and examine yourself for ticks.

Ticks Have Limited Mobility

Should Albertans be worried about lyme disease from ticks?

At the risk of stating the obvious, ticks are wingless and therefore cannot fly. Neither can they run or jump. The species of tick that transmit the Borrelia bacteria that cause Lyme disease move very little laterally on the ground, that is, in the horizontal plane.

When a blood-fed larva drops from the skin of a bird or mammal, it moves directly downwards with the prospect of finding humid vegetation. There, it undergoes digestion and it moults into the next active life stage, the nymph.

If the larva happens to drop from its host onto a dry path or other unsuitable terrain, then it will most likely desiccate and die.

In the event of success, the emerged nymph will begin to seek a host. It does this by climbing vertically on whatever vegetation happens to be in the immediate vicinity.

You May Like: Vital Plan For Lyme Disease Anyone

How Do I Know If I Have A Tick Bite

Many people who develop the disease do not remember seeing ticks or being bitten. Tick bites commonly occur from May to September in North America, although blacklegged ticks can be active most of the year. Ticks sometimes move around on the body but they usually attach themselves to the skin and stay in one place. Before feeding, ticks look like small, brown scabs or freckles. After feeding, ticks may swell considerably, and could be as big as a raisin or a small grape.

Follow the link for more information about blacklegged ticks from the Government of Canada.

I Just Found A Tick Attached To Me What Should I Do

Dont panic. First, remove the tick with a pair of tweezers. Grasp the tick close to the skin and pull directly upwards until the tick comes free.

Try to remove the tick whole. If you do, it is likely the tick will still be alive and moving.

Place the tick in a plastic bag or other sealed container. Try to identify what kind of tick it is that bit you. An online tick identification chart, like the one from the University of Rhode Islands TickEncounter Resource Center may be helpful. If you are not sure what type of tick bit you, it is best to bring it to your doctor or someone else who can identify ticks.

Its important to remember that Lyme disease is not the only infection spread by deer ticks, and deer ticks are not the only ticks that can spread infections. After any tick bite, you should monitor your health. If you develop a high fever or chills, you should seek medical attention, and be sure to mention to the doctor that you have recently had a tick bite.

Don’t Miss: Lyme Disease Ticks Look Like

What Are Some Symptoms Of Lyme Disease

The most visible sign of Lyme disease is the characteristic rash called erythema migrans or “bull’s eye.”

This rash:

  • Usually develops within one month of the tick bite
  • Typically occurs at the site of the bite, starting as a red area and then expanding in size over days and weeks
  • Can become as large as 8 inches in diameter and typically develops around an area of clear skin giving it a “bull’s eye” appearance.

Only about 30% of people who develop this rash actually recall having a tick bite.

It is important to know that it is very common to have a small area of redness at the site of a tick bite immediately after the bite due to irritation from the ticks saliva. This is a different rash and does not indicate Lyme disease.

This type of rash will go away after 24-48 hours and does not expand over time. If you are not sure which type of rash is present, it is important to see your health care provider.

Other early signs and symptoms of Lyme disease include:

  • Aching joints and muscles
  • Swollen lymph nodes

If not treated, Lyme can affect the heart, joints, and nervous system.

Ticks Have A Finite Fuel Supply

It

Ticks waiting for a host to appear.

Ticks limit their horizontal movement for a very good reason an economic one. A blood-fed larva that drops from a host has a finite energy supply of fat. Think of it as a full fuel tank. The more a tick moves, the more fuel it burns.

If it runs out of fuel before making contact with a host, then life ends for that particular tick. So, ticks have evolved a strategy to conserve their energy supplies by minimising their movement. They climb vertically and wait and wait and wait.

Usually, they will position themselves at or close to the tip of a structure, whether it be a leaf, twig, bracken, grass or rush stem. Ticks can be found on vegetation from a few centimetres to almost 2 metres above ground level. When no hosts are nearby, ticks can assume a resting or quiescent position with front legs folded.

In the event of ticks becoming dehydrated, they will move downward into the moist vegetation mat to replenish their bodily water content, before climbing vertically once more.

Read Also: Lyme Disease Doctors In Virginia

Who’s At Risk And Where Are Ticks Found

The risk of getting Lyme disease is higher:

  • for people who spend time in woodland or moorland areas
  • from March to October because more people take part in outdoor activities

Ticks are found throughout the UK and in other parts of Europe and North America. There are a high number of ticks in the Scottish Highlands.

It’s thought only a small proportion of ticks carry the bacteria that cause Lyme disease. Being bitten doesn’t mean you’ll definitely be infected. However, it’s important to be aware of the risk and speak to a GP if you start to feel unwell.

Who Is At Risk For Lyme Disease

Anyone can get a tick bite. But people who spend lots of time outdoors in wooded, grassy areas are at a higher risk. This includes campers, hikers, and people who work in gardens and parks.

Most tick bites happen in the summer months when ticks are most active and people spend more time outdoors. But you can get bitten in the warmer months of early fall, or even late winter if temperatures are unusually high. And if there is a mild winter, ticks may come out earlier than usual.

Recommended Reading: Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome Mayo Clinic

How Can I Prevent Tick Bites

The best way to beat Lyme disease is to avoid the ticks that spread it. Ticks cannot jump or fly, and must wait for a passing animal to grab hold of. They live in areas with tall grass and bushes, and where there are thick layers of plant debris. They do not survive well on well trimmed lawns where the sun will quickly dry them out.

Keep your bushes well trimmed and your lawn free of garden debris. When walking in areas with tall grass or brush, it is important to cover arms and legs with long shirt sleeves and long pants, and to tuck pant cuffs into socks to deny ticks entrance.

Insecticide sprays such as permethrin can be used on clothing before outdoor activities. One application will last in fabric for several months. Insect repellent such as DEET or picaridin can be used on skin, and only last several hours at the most. Apply according to the directions on the package, and be careful not to get it in your eyes or mouth.

After coming in from the outdoors, it is important to look over your body and/or your childs body for ticks. This is best done in the shower or bath. Pay close attention to areas where the ticks may hide in the armpits, in the groin, in the belly button, and on the scalp and behind the ears.

Who Gets Lyme Disease And At What Time Of Year

How quickly can a tick make you sick?

Lyme disease is transmitted via the bite of infected ticks, which attach to any part of the body, but often to moist or hairy areas such as the groin, armpits, and scalp.

While everyone is susceptible to tick bites, campers, hikers, and people who work in gardens and other leafy outdoor venues are at the greatest risk of tick bites. As many a suburban gardener can attest, with the expansion of the suburbs and a push to conserve wooded areas, deer and mice populations are thriving, too, providing ample blood meals for ticks. For lyme disease to be transmitted, a tick needs to feed on the host for 24-48 hours.

In the majority of cases, tick bites are reported in the summer months when ticks are most active and people spend more time outdoors. But this can extend into the warmer months of early autumn, too, or even late winter if temperatures are unusually high. Similarly, a mild winter can allow ticks, much like other insects, to thrive and emerge earlier than usual.

You May Like: How To Tell If Your Cat Has Lyme Disease

Where Blacklegged Ticks Live

We continue to track where infected and uninfected blacklegged ticks are being found.

Public Health Ontarios Lyme disease page has a map that shows areas in Ontario where they estimate you are more likely to find blacklegged ticks.

Blacklegged ticks are spreading to new areas of the province because of climate change. They can also spread by traveling on birds and deer. While the probability is low, it is possible to find an infected tick almost anywhere in Ontario.

Ticks are most active in spring and summer, but can be found at any time of the year when the temperature is above freezing.

How Can I Prevent Lyme Disease

While walking in green spaces, consider wearing clothing that covers your skin to make it more difficult for ticks to access a suitable place to bite.

Use insect repellent such as DEET and consider wearing light coloured clothing so that you can easily spot ticks and brush them off.

After spending time outside, check yourself, your clothing, your pets and others for ticks. Remove any attached tick as soon as you find it using a tick-removal tool or fine-tipped tweezers.

More information can be found on the NHS website.

The idea of being bitten by a tick can be daunting. It is important to know that with the right precautions and by being tick aware you can help to protect yourself and your family from tick bites.

Remember that advice and treatment is readily available through the NHS. So, if you think you have been bitten by a tick and have symptoms, contact your GP and accept the treatment that is offered to you.

You May Like: Old Lyme Ct School Calendar

Video Answer: Dogs Can Get A Lyme Disease Vaccine Why Cant Humans

Home care for dogs with Lyme disease is relatively straightforward.

Doxycycline is usually given by mouth twice daily for at least 30 days.

Improvement in the dogs symptoms should be noted within 24-48 hours.

In the past, it may have been difficult for dogs to survive Lyme disease due to the inability to diagnose the disease.

Now, there are numerous tests for vets to use to determine whether or not your pooch has Lyme disease.

These symptoms are caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium in the bite of an infected tick.

There are three states of Lyme disease in dogs: acute, subacute, and chronic.

Symptoms generally do not appear until after a two- to five-month incubation period, and can take even longer.

In rare cases, kidney damage can escalate to Lyme nephritis, which is usually fatal.

Antibiotics generally provide relief from Lyme disease, but relapses can occur.

Spot-on tick-control products can kill or repel ticks that carry Lyme disease, as can some tick collars.

There is a Lyme disease vaccine for dogs, but its not always part of a dogs routine vaccination protocol.

More articles

Popular Articles