Wednesday, February 21, 2024

Does Lyme Disease Come And Go

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Enhancing Healthcare Team Outcomes

Can Lyme Disease Symptoms Come Back?

The key to Lyme disease is prevention and this requires an interprofessional team approach. All healthcare workers including the nurse practitioner, pharmacist, and primary care provider should provide patient education on measures to prevent tick bites while hiking or working outdoors. In areas where ticks are common, cleaning up of the environment by removing the underbrush and spraying an insecticide may reduce the tick burden in the area. The outdoors person should be told to wear appropriate garments and be familiar with the skin features of the tick bite. The nurse should educate the patient on how to remove the tick from the skin and when to seek medical assistance. The pharmacist should educate the patient on medication compliance for those who have been confirmed to have acquired Lyme disease.

Nurses should educate parents how to inspect their children for ticks at the end of an outdoor event, in an endemic area. While there are many repellants on the market, it is best to avoid them as the risk of harm is greater than any benefit. If one is going to use a repellant, DEET is the one product that is safe, however, it is not 100% effective. finally, the pharmacist should educate the patient about the harms of taking prophylactic doxycycline a better strategy is to remove the tick as soon as it is visualized.

Outcomes

What Do Common Symptoms Of Lyme Disease Feel Like

The symptoms described below are grouped by where or how they affect your body.

To learn more about symptoms listed in this image, click on the corresponding categories in the accordion, below.

These symptoms of Lyme disease are not specific to one of the other categories.

Chills

Chills often accompany fever, but dont have to. You may feel cold even though youre not in a cold environment. Your body may shake, shiver, or tremble your teeth may chatter and you may get goosebumps. Chills are your bodys way of raising its core temperature often to help fend off an infection.

Fever

Fevers associated with Lyme disease are most common early in infection. Lyme-associated fevers can be low or high.

Loss of appetite

The medical term for loss of appetite is anorexia, but this is different from the eating disorder anorexia nervosa. You may not feel hungry, or food may not seem appealing to you, which could lead to weight loss.

Swollen lymph nodes

Lymph nodes contain immune cells that fight infection. They are located all over your body. When you are fighting an infection, you may feel swollen lymph nodes at the side of your neck, or in other places like under your chin or in your armpits or groin. They may be tender or painful. Its a good idea to let your doctor know about any swelling in the area of lymph nodes.

Is There A Blood Test For Lyme Disease

If your doctor suspects that you have Lyme disease, they may order two blood tests. These will look for signs that your body is trying to fight it off. The results are most precise a few weeks after youâve been infected.

These tests are:

ELISA test. This test canât check for the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. It can only look for your immune systemâs response to it.

Once Borrelia burgdorferi gets into your blood, your body begins to make special proteins called antibodies to fight it off. The ELISA test checks for those antibodies.

Although itâs the most common way to check for Lyme disease, the ELISA test isnât perfect. It can sometimes give false âpositiveâ results. On the other hand, if you have it done too soon after youâve been infected, your body may not have developed enough antibodies for the test to detect them. This will give you a ânegativeâ result even though you do have Lyme disease.

Western blot test. Whether your ELISA test comes back positive or negative, your doctor will need to do this blood test, too.

A Western blot uses electricity to split certain proteins in your blood into patterns. This is then compared to the pattern of people known to have Lyme disease.

At least five band matches means that you have Lyme disease. Still, not all labs have the same standards. Thereâs a chance that you could get a âpositiveâ result from one and a ânegativeâ result from another.

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How Is Lyme Disease Treated

Your healthcare provider will figure out the best treatment for you based on:

  • How old you are

Lyme disease in the earliest stage is usually treated with antibiotics for 2 to 3 weeks.

Treatment will also be considered based on these and other factors:

  • If you are bitten by a tick that tests positive for the bacteria that causes Lyme disease

  • If you are bitten by a tick and have any of the symptoms

  • If you are bitten by a tick and are pregnant

  • If you are bitten by a tick and live in a high-risk area

Diagnosis Testing And Treatment

Does Lyme Disease Ever Really Go Away?

You may have heard that the blood test for Lyme disease is correctly positive only 65% of the time or less. This is misleading information. As with serologic tests for other infectious diseases, the accuracy of the test depends upon how long youve been infected. During the first few weeks of infection, such as when a patient has an erythema migrans rash, the test is expected to be negative.

Several weeks after infection, FDA cleared tests have very good sensitivity.

It is possible for someone who was infected with Lyme disease to test negative because:

  • Some people who receive antibiotics early in disease may not have a fully developed antibody response or may only develop an antibody response at levels too low to be detected by the test.
  • Antibodies against Lyme disease bacteria usually take a few weeks to develop, so tests performed before this time may be negative even if the person is infected. In this case, if the person is retested a few weeks later, they should have a positive test if they have Lyme disease. It is not until 4 to 6 weeks have passed that the test is likely to be positive. This does not mean that the test is bad, only that it needs to be used correctly.
  • If you are pregnant and suspect you have contracted Lyme disease, contact your physician immediately.

  • Telford SR, Wormser GP. Bartonella transmission by ticks not established.Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Mar 16 379-84.
    • Report being bitten by a tick, or
    • Live in, or have recently visited, a tick-infested area.

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    Does The Lyme Disease Rash Come And Go

    The rash that comes with Lyme disease is a characteristic sign of the disease. It is red and grows slowly around the bug bite. Sometimes the rash will be as large as a plate and it can last for weeks. If you notice these symptoms, you should visit your doctor right away.

    The rash will appear within a few days to weeks after being infected, but if it is left untreated, it will spread throughout your body. When this happens, the rash is called stage two and can occur up to six months after the bite. This rash is mildly itchy, but it does not itch like poison ivy.

    A rash that comes with Lyme disease usually begins at the spot of the tick bite and is up to 12 inches wide. It will be red in the center, but it may fade to form a bulls-eye. The rash can also be hot and feel tender to the touch. A typical rash will appear within 30 days of the tick bite, and it will stay for three to five weeks. However, one in five people will never experience a distinctive rash. People may also experience other symptoms such as hives, redness under the eyes, and burning.

    Who’s At Risk Of Lyme Disease

    The risk of getting Lyme disease is higher:

    • for people who spend time in woodland or moorland areas
    • from March to October because more people take part in outdoor activities

    It’s thought only a small proportion of ticks carry the bacteria that cause Lyme disease. Being bitten doesn’t mean you’ll definitely be infected. However, it’s important to be aware of the risk and speak to a GP if you start to feel unwell.

    Also Check: How To Treat Neurological Lyme Disease

    How To Remove Ticks

    Tick bites arent always painful. You may not notice a tick unless you see it on your skin. Check your skin and your childrens or pets skin after being outdoors.

    To remove a tick:

  • Use fine-tipped tweezers or a tick-removal tool. You can buy these from some pharmacies, vets and pet shops.
  • Grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible.
  • Slowly pull upwards, taking care not to squeeze or crush the tick. Dispose of it when youve removed it.
  • Clean the bite with antiseptic or soap and water.
  • The risk of getting ill is low. You dont need to do anything else unless you become unwell.

    What To Do If You Have A Blacklegged Tick Bite

    Early Signs and Symptoms of Lyme Disease

    Remove the tick by pulling it directly out with fine-tipped tweezers. Lift upward with slow and even pressure. Dont twist when removing it. Dont crush it or put soap or other substances on it. Dont apply heat to it.

    Place the tick in a resealable container. See if you can identify what kind of a tick it is.

    Immediately after removing the tick, wash your skin well with soap and water or with rubbing alcohol.

    Not all ticks carry Lyme. The Lyme bacteria is transmitted only by blacklegged ticks in their nymph or adult stage.

    Save the tick to show your doctor. The doctor will want to determine if its a blacklegged tick and if theres evidence of feeding. Ticks enlarge as they feed. Your risk of getting Lyme from an infected tick increases with the length of time that the tick fed on your blood.

    Summary:

    Pull the tick out with tweezers and save it in a resealable container for identification.

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    What Are The Symptoms

    The main feature of Lyme arthritis is obvious swelling of one or a few joints. While the knees are affected most often, other large joints such as the shoulder, ankle, elbow, jaw, wrist, and hip can also be involved. The joint may feel warm to the touch or cause pain during movement. Joint swelling can come and go or move between joints, and it may be difficult to detect in the shoulder, hip, or jaw. Lyme arthritis typically develops within one to a few months after infection.

    What Are The Symptoms Of Chronic Lyme Disease

    Home » Tick Talk » What Are the Symptoms of Chronic Lyme Disease?

    Despite some skepticism in the medical community, chronic Lyme disease is a growing epidemic in the U.S. This stems partly from the shortcomings of many of the officially recommended Lyme disease tests, which leave too many patients with untreated infections that then become persistent and debilitating.

    The following article will cover what you should know about chronic Lyme and provide an introductory but non-exhaustive chronic Lyme disease symptoms checklist.

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    A Reasonable Approach To Post

    If you are being treated for PTLD, there is no magic bullet to treat this problem, but here are some important steps to consider:

    • Choose a doctor you trust and who can work closely with you.
    • If your doctor agrees to start antibiotics for several months, make sure you talk about the risks and cost, as this can be dangerous and expensive.
    • Make sure not to rely solely on antibiotics. The evidence for a benefit from antibiotics is weak, and we rely mostly on physicians clinical experience and interest in the disease to design a personalized therapeutic plan. For some, a more holistic approach may be the way to go.
    • If you try supplements, ask about their source and purity, as they are not FDA-regulated.
    • Consider looking for services in medical school hospitals or clinics where they may have programs with ongoing research on how to diagnose and treat Lyme.

    Can Lyme Disease Be Prevented

    Lyme Disease

    There’s no sure way to avoid getting Lyme disease. But you can minimize your risk. Be aware of ticks when you’re in high-risk areas. If you work outdoors or spend time gardening, fishing, hunting, or camping, take precautions:

    • Wear closed shoes or boots, long-sleeved shirts, and long pants. Tuck your pant legs into your shoes or boots to prevent ticks from crawling up your legs.
    • Use an insect repellent containing 10% to 30% DEET .
    • Wear light-colored clothing to help you see ticks more easily.
    • Keep long hair pulled back or wear a hat for protection.
    • Don’t sit on the ground outside.
    • Check yourself for ticks regularly both indoors and outdoors. Wash your clothes and hair after leaving tick-infested areas.

    If you use an insect repellent containing DEET, follow the directions on the product’s label and don’t overapply it. Place DEET on shirt collars and sleeves and pant cuffs, and only use it directly on exposed areas of skin. Be sure to wash it off when you go back indoors.

    No vaccine for Lyme disease is currently on the market in the United States.

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    Stages Of Lyme Disease And Their Common Symptoms

    If you have already been diagnosed with Lyme disease, learning about Lyme stages can help you know what symptoms you might experience. Youll also be able to watch for signs that could mean that your Lyme disease has progressed. Lyme disease symptoms are more likely to progress if you have not been appropriately treated.

    If you dont have a Lyme disease diagnosis, its helpful to know that Lyme disease can cause a variety of seemingly unrelated symptoms throughout your body. If you develop symptoms listed below, especially after youve gotten a tick bite or spent time in an area where Lyme disease is common, you can ask your doctor whether you might have Lyme disease and if you should be tested for it. .

    There are three stages of Lyme disease. Early localized, or Stage 1, Lyme disease occurs soon after being infected, when Lyme bacteria are still close to the site of the tick bite. Common symptoms of early localized Lyme disease include a rash or mild, flulike symptoms. Over time the Lyme bacteria can spread, or disseminate, to other parts of the body, causing more serious symptoms associated with early disseminated or late disseminated Lyme disease. This is more likely if you are not diagnosed and treated early.

    Chronic Lyme Disease Vs Acute And Late Stage Lyme

    One reason chronic Lyme disease is harder to detect and treat than Lyme at earlier stages is that chronic Lyme disease symptoms are more wide-ranging and varied. Chronic Lyme disease can cause symptoms of early Lyme disease such as fatigue and muscle aches to recur, but it can also cause new symptoms that affect different parts of the body.

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    Chronic Lyme: What Happens When Lyme Goes Untreated

    The Lyme community typically uses the term chronic Lyme disease to describe a range of physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms that crop up after getting Lyme disease and persist for months to years after infection.

    The risk of chronic Lyme increases the longer a Lyme infection goes untreated or undertreated. In other words, patients are more likely to recover fully if their Lyme infection is detected and treated as early as possible after the discovery of a tick bite. This stage is usually marked by symptoms such as fevers, chills, muscle aches, and sometimes rashes.

    When left untreated or undertreated, however, Lyme disease can spread throughout the body and affect:

    • The central nervous system

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    What Are The Symptoms Of Lyme Disease

    Long Haul Lyme Disease Risk Found: Even in Early Treated Patients | Johns Hopkins Rheumatology

    The list of possible symptoms is long, and symptoms can affect every part of the body. The following are the most common symptoms of Lyme disease. But symptoms are slightly different for each person.

    The primary symptom is a red rash that:

    • Can appear several days after infection, or not at all

    • Can last up to several weeks

    • Can be very small or grow very large , and may resemble a “bulls-eye”

    • Can mimic such skin problems as hives, eczema, sunburn, poison ivy, and flea bites

    • Can itch or feel hot, or may not be felt at all

    • Can disappear and return several weeks later

    Several days or weeks after a bite from an infected tick, you may have flu-like symptoms such as the following:

    Weeks to months after the bite, the following symptoms may develop:

    • Neurological symptoms, including inflammation of the nervous system and weakness and paralysis of the facial muscles

    • Heart problems, including inflammation of the heart and problems with heart rate

    • Eye problems, including inflammation

    Months to a few years after a bite, the following symptoms may include:

    • Inflammation of the joints

    • Neurological symptoms including numbness in the extremities, tingling and pain, and difficulties with speech, memory, and concentration

    Some people may develop post-Lyme disease syndrome . A condition also known as chronic Lyme disease includes PLDS, but also other syndromes. Usually, these are characterized by persistent musculoskeletal and peripheral nerve pain, fatigue, and memory impairment.

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    Can A Bullseye Rash Not Be Lyme Disease

    The bullseye rash is one of the classic telltale signs of Lyme disease, but not everyone who contracts the disease will develop the characteristic rash. In fact, up to 30 percent of patients do not show the characteristic rash. Because Lyme is such an imitator of other illnesses, its not uncommon for people to have the bullseye rash without ever experiencing the other symptoms associated with the disease.

    The ticks that carry Lyme disease are tiny and are difficult to detect. The bite of a tick is not painful, and it may not be noticed for weeks or months after the bite. Ticks can be found throughout the UK and many other parts of Europe and North America, but they are particularly common in areas with overgrown plants and deep vegetation. Theyre commonly found in forests and moorland areas, but they can also be found in gardens.

    A woman who presented with flu-like symptoms and a bullseye rash was diagnosed with early Lyme disease. After being treated with doxycycline, the rash cleared up within a week. She later reported experiencing generalized joint pain and irritation behind her knee. Cellulitis was the primary diagnosis, but it is not the only rash that can confuse clinicians.

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