Tuesday, September 20, 2022

How Can You Get Lyme Disease Without Tick Bite

Must read

Complications Of Untreated Lyme Disease

How to Prevent Tick Bites This Season

If unchecked, the Lyme disease infection can spread to other bodily systems, causing significant damage. Untreated, complications of this condition can be very severe:

  • Arthritis:Prolonged infection with Lyme disease leads to chronic joint inflammation and swelling, usually in the knees . These symptoms tend to arise within two years of infection, with periods of flare-ups and remissions. This arthritis is relatively difficult to manage, though antibiotics and steroids may be attempted.
  • Lyme carditis:If the bacteria reach the heart tissues, they can cause inflammation and lead to heart block. The electrical signals being sent between the upper and lower chambers of the heart are interrupted, impairing the coordination of the heartbeat. Though disruptive, this is rarely fatal.
  • Lyme neuroborreliosis:Inflammation of multiple nerves, including those in the spine and brain, is the chief characteristic of this condition. This can also affect the meningesthe layer of tissue surrounding the brain and spineleading to meningitis, among other conditions. Antibiotic therapy, if applied promptly, tends to be effective as a treatment.

Even in cases where Lyme disease has progressed, antibiotic regimensespecially drugs like doxycyclineare generally successful in resolving problems.

Symptoms Of A Tick Bite

  • A tick bite does not cause pain or itch. So, ticks may not be noticed for a few days.
  • After feeding on blood, ticks get swollen and easier to see.
  • Ticks fall off on their own after sucking blood for 3 to 6 days.
  • After the tick comes off, a little red bump may be seen.
  • The red bump or spot is the body’s response to the tick’s saliva .
  • While it’s sucking blood, some of its spit gets mixed in.

When To See A Healthcare Provider

Since Lyme disease can take different forms, and since its often confused with other conditions, its important to be proactive if you suspect the condition. What signs prompt medical help? Call the healthcare provider if:

  • You have a bullseye rashor any kind of rashfollowing a tick bite.
  • You experience flu-like symptoms after a tick bite.
  • You experience symptoms of more advanced Lyme disease: arthritis, heart palpitations, facial paralysis, dizziness, and others.

Recommended Reading: What Is The Medication For Lyme Disease

Rocky Mountain Wood Ticks And Colorado Tick Fever

The mocha-colored Rocky Mountain wood tick lives in the northwestern United States and in Canada. Young Rocky Mountain wood ticks bite small rodents adult ticks are more likely to latch onto deer, dogs, livestock, and people. Before going on a walk in the woods or in a grassy area near the woods, use a safe insect repellent that contains DEET to prevent tick bites. The CDC’s DEET information page shows which formulations are okay to spray directly on your skin.

The Rocky Mountain wood tick’s bite can transmit diseases including a virus that causes Colorado tick fever, as well as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tick paralysis, and tularemia. Colorado tick fever symptoms resemble the flu: They leave you tired, achy, and with chills, according to the CDC. The illness is usually short-lived, but there is no treatment. In rare cases, complications can develop, including hepatitis and pneumonia.

How To Avoid Tick Bites

Can you get Lyme disease without a tick bite?

To reduce the chance of being bitten:

  • cover your skin while walking outdoors and tuck your trousers into your socks
  • use insect repellent on your clothes and skin products containing DEET are best
  • stay on clear paths whenever possible
  • wear light-coloured clothing so ticks are easier to see and brush off

Read Also: Where To Buy Lyme Vaccine For Dogs

How Is Lyme Disease Diagnosed

Your doctor will diagnose you based on your symptoms and whether youâve been exposed to a tick. They might also run a blood test. In the first few weeks of infection, the test may be negative because antibodies take a few weeks to show up.

Hopefully soon, there will be tests that can diagnose Lyme disease in the first few weeks after youâre exposed. The earlier you get treated, the less likely itâll get worse.

Appropriately Remove The Tick

Next, it’s important to remove the tick as soon as possible. The longer the tick stays embedded, the greater the chances of microbes being transmitted. And don’t depend on the 48-hour rulethe theory that there’s no risk of Lyme disease if the tick has been embedded for less than 48 hours has been proved false. Microbes can be transmitted as quickly as a few hours for Lyme disease and possibly faster for other tick-borne microbes.

To remove a tick properly, take a pair of tweezers and grasp the tick as far down on the head as possible and pluck it out with a twisting motion. Try to remove all of the head and mouth parts. Then, wash the area with soap and water.

You could save the tick alive and send it to a lab to determine the tick species and have it tested for microbes. But testing is limited to only certain microbes and isn’t always reliable. Most people simply dispose of the tick. The best way to dispose of it is by putting it in alcohol, sealing it in a bag, wrapping it tightly in tape, or simply flushing it down the toilet.

Also Check: Can You Get Lyme Disease More Than Once

Identify The Tick You Were Bitten By

Its important to identify the tick because different kinds of ticks can carry different bacteria, viruses, protozoa and parasites.

There are two families of ticks found in the United States: Ixodidae and Argasidae . Of the 700 species of hard ticks and 200 species of soft ticks found throughout the world, only a few are known to bite and transmit disease to humans. Knowing the type of tick will help you be aware of what possible symptoms to watch for.

What Do I Do If I Find A Tick On My Skin

Here’s what you should do if you’ve been bitten by a tick

Dont panic. Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skins surface as possible. Pull up with steady, even pressure. Be careful not to squeeze or twist the tick body. Sometimes parts of the tick remain in the skin. You can leave them alone or carefully remove them the same way you would a splinter. Do not use heat , petroleum jelly, or other methods to try to make the tick back out on its own. These methods are not effective.

Wash the area where the tick was attached thoroughly with soap and water. Keep an eye on the area for a few weeks and note any changes. Call your doctor if you develop a rash around the area where the tick was attached. Be sure to tell your doctor that you were bitten by a tick and when it happened.

Don’t Miss: Can Lyme Disease Go Away

Can Lyme Disease Be Prevented Or Avoided

The best way to prevent Lyme disease is to avoid being bitten by ticks. When you are outdoors, follow these guidelines:

  • Avoid areas that are wooded, brushy, or have tall grass.
  • Walk in the center of trails.
  • Use an insect repellent with at least 20% DEET. It can be put on clothing or sparingly on the skin. Dont apply it to the face or hands of children.
  • Treat clothing, tents, or other gear with repellents containing 0.5% permethrin.
  • Wear light-colored clothing. This makes it easier to see and remove ticks from your clothes.
  • Wear a long-sleeved shirt and long pants. Tuck your pant legs into your socks or boots for added protection.

After you get home, check everything and everyone for ticks.

  • Bathe or shower as soon as you can to wash off any ticks that have not attached to you.
  • Check your entire body for ticks. Use a mirror for places you cant see. Check your children and your pets. Common tick locations include the back of the knees, groin area, underarms, ears, scalp, and the back of the neck.
  • Check any gear you used, including coats, backpacks, or tents.

Tumble dry clothes or blankets on high heat in the dryer for 10 to 15 minutes. This should kill any ticks. If clothes are dirty, wash them in hot water and dry on high heat for 60 minutes.

How Long The Tick Is Attached

In general, it takes about 36 to 48 hours for Lyme bacteria to enter the bloodstream after a tick bite. So if you remove the tick within a day and a half, your risk of getting Lyme disease is substantially lowered. Using tweezers is thought to be the best approach for tick removal: carefully grab the tick near its head or mouth and do not squeeze or crush it, but instead pull gently and slowly in an upward direction.

Read Also: Can Lyme Disease Cause Parkinson’s

Borrelia Burgdorferi Infectious Cycle

The infectious cycle of B burgdorferi involves colonization, infection of Ixodes ticks, and then transmission to broad a range of mammalian hosts, including humans. Variation in environmental and host conditions promotes different gene expression and changes in the composition of the membrane proteins of the spirochete. This adaptation is a critical step in the pathogenesis and transmission of Lyme disease.

The Ixodes tick progresses through four stages of development: egg, larva, nymph, and adult . Only larvae, nymphs, and adult female ticks require blood meals, and only ticks in the nymphal and adult stages can transmit B burgdorferi.

The life cycle of Ixodes ticks spans 2 years . The adult lays eggs in the spring, and the larvae emerge in the summer. The larvae feed once, in late summer, on any of a wide variety of small animals . The following spring, the larvae emerge as nymphs. Nymphs feed once, in the spring and summer. The white-footed mouse is the preferred feeding source of nymphs, but other animals apparently suffice. Nymphs molt into adults the following fall and feed once on a larger animal, with the white-tailed deer being the preferred host.

Ticks carry B burgdorferi organisms in their midgut. The bacteria are introduced into the skin by a bite from an infected tick, and disease is transmitted to humans as the spirochete is translocated from the gut to the salivary glands and then to the person at the site of the bite.

Essential Steps When Checking For Lyme Disease

BE TICKED OFF!  Lyme Disease Is Preventable  KUUS Inc.

Not all people with Lyme disease develop the bulls eye rash. But if you do get it, measure the red patch around the bite to see if its expanding:

  • Measure and record the patchs height and width with a ruler
  • Repeat the next day. Give these numbers to your physician.
  • Take pictures of the rash and share with your doctor.
  • Make a note if you experience fever, energy loss, and unusual joint stiffness. These are all common symptoms of early Lyme disease.
  • Recommended Reading: Laser Treatment For Lyme Disease

    Racial Differences In Incidence

    Lyme disease is reported primarily in whites, although it occurs in individuals of all races. No genetic explanation is known for this the disparity most likely stems from social or environmental factors and possibly to the fact that erythema migrans is more difficult to diagnose in dark-skinned individuals.

    Seek Medical Care Early To Prevent Lyme Disease From Progressing

    Its easy to get bit by a tick and not know it. Most people dont feel a tick on their skin or the bite. Checking your skin for ticks after spending time outdoors can help you find a tick and remove it.

    Removing a tick can prevent Lyme disease. A tick must be attached to your skin for at least 36 hours to infect you with the bacteria that cause Lyme disease.

    Its not always possible to find a tick, so its important to pay close attention to your skin. If you notice any signs of Lyme disease or develop a rash, get medical care right away. Ticks can cause other serious diseases, such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    Related AAD resources

    ImagesImage 1: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Image Library, Last accessed May 11, 2017.

    Images 2, 3, and 7: Used with permission of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2011 64:619-36.

    Image 6: Used with permission of the American Academy of Dermatology National Library of Dermatologic Teaching Slides.

    ReferencesBhate C and Schwartz RA.

    • Lyme disease: Part I. Advances and perspectives. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2011 64:619-36.

    • Lyme disease: Part II. Management and prevention. J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 64:639-53.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

    You May Like: How Do You Get Diagnosed With Lyme Disease

    Signs Of Lyme Disease That Appear On Your Skin

    Signs of Lyme disease

    If you see a rash or another sign of Lyme disease on your skin, see your primary doctor right away. When caught early and treated, Lyme disease can be cured with antibiotics and most people recover fully.

    Lyme disease is caused by a bite from a black-legged tick. If you are bitten by this tick and develop Lyme disease, you may see a bulls-eye rash. Its a common sign of Lyme disease, but its not the only sign.

    Lyme disease occurs in stages. Heres what you may see on your skin during each stage.

    When To Call A Doctor

    How to prevent tick bites this season
    • A tick is attached to your body and you can’t remove the entire tick.
    • You have a circular red rash that expands over the course of several days, especially if you know you were recently exposed to ticks. You may also have flu-like symptoms, such as fatigue, headache, stiff neck, fever, chills, or body aches.
    • You feel very tired or have joint pain , irregular heartbeats, severe headache, or neck pain.
    • You are pregnant or breastfeeding and you think you may have been exposed to ticks.

    You May Like: Lyme Disease Specialists In Massachusetts

    Stage : Late Disseminated Lyme Disease

    Late disseminated Lyme disease occurs when the infection hasnt been treated in stages 1 and 2. Stage 3 can occur months or years after the tick bite.

    This stage is characterized by:

    • arthritis of one or more large joints
    • brain disorders, such as encephalopathy, which can cause short-term memory loss, difficulty concentrating, mental fogginess, problems with following conversations and sleep disturbance
    • numbness in the arms, legs, hands, or feet

    What Is Late Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease, also known as Lyme borreliosis, is caused by an infection with the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. This bacteria is disseminated through tick bites. Infected ticks usually bite small mammals, who do not develop any kind of infection from the bacteria. When humans are exposed to B. Burgdorferi from a tick bite, however, they can develop Lyme disease.

    People who work outside or spend time in woodland areas, where there is greater potential for exposure to tick bites, are most at risk of infection.

    Lyme disease is a condition which progresses in stages:

  • A person will initially develop early localized lyme disease, in which the bacteria have not yet spread through the body. At this stage, which generally has its onset days or weeks after the tick bite, a personâs symptoms will usually include a fever, fatigue, and a rash, called the Erythema Migrans rash, which has a distinctive bullsâ eye shape and affects around two thirds of people who develop Lyme disease. See this resource for more information on symptoms and treatment of early localized Lyme disease.
  • If Lyme disease is not diagnosed in either of these early stages, and is not treated effectively with antibiotics, the bacteria that cause LD can spread throughout the body from the site of the tick bite, resulting in late disseminated Lyme disease, or late lyme disease. The onset of symptoms and complications of late disseminated Lyme disease is usually around 6-36 months after the original infection.
  • Also Check: What To Do If I Have Lyme Disease

    What Happens At Your Appointment

    The GP will ask about your symptoms and consider any rash or recent tick bites you know about.

    Lyme disease can be difficult to diagnose. It has similar symptoms to other conditions and there’s not always an obvious rash.

    2 types of blood test are available to help confirm or rule out Lyme disease. But these tests are not always accurate in the early stages of the disease.

    You may need to be retested if you still have Lyme disease symptoms after a negative result.

    Stage : Small Oval Rashes Or A Reddish Lump

    Ticked Off

    When a tick that causes Lyme disease bites you, it infects you with bacteria. Without treatment, the bacteria can spread to other areas of your body. Stage 2 begins when the bacteria spread to other parts of your body.

    During this stage, you may see small, oval rashes on your skin. Some people develop a bluish-red lump.

    Where you see these signs: Because the infection has spread, small rashes can appear anywhere on your skin, except for your palms and soles. Most rashes appear on the arms, legs, and face.

    Some people develop a lump, which your doctor may refer to as borrelial lymphocytoma. In children, this lump tends to appear on an earlobe. Adults often see a raised growth form around a nipple.

    Borrelial lymphocytoma on a childs ear

    This can appear in stage 2 of Lyme disease.

    What you may see on your skin: The rashes that appear during stage 2 differ from the rash that can appear in stage 1. In stage 2, the rashes stay the same size rather than grow larger.

    When the rashes, lump, and symptoms begin: About 30 to 45 days after the tick bites you, you may notice rashes or a lump. These can also take longer to appear, sometimes six months or more.

    Some people develop symptoms, which make them feel ill, including:

    • Fever

    • Shortness of breath and dizzy spells

    • Bells palsy, which causes one half of the face to droop

    • Heart problems, such as chest pains or an irregular heartbeat

    Recommended Reading: How To Treat Lyme Disease Flare Ups

    More articles

    Popular Articles