Wednesday, June 15, 2022

What Are The Signs Of Lyme Disease In Humans

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What Do You Do If There’s A Tick Under Your Skin

Do you know the signs of Lyme disease?

Use a pair of fine-tipped tweezers to remove it as soon as possible. Pull upward with steady pressure. If parts of the tick are still in your skin, try to get those with the tweezers, too. After everything is out, clean the bite area with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.

You probably wonât get infected if you remove the tick within 36 to 48 hours.

How do you throw away a tick?

Put it in soapy water or alcohol, stick it to a piece of tape, or flush it down the toilet.

Stage : Changing Skin

In stage 3, few signs of Lyme disease appear on the skin. Most problems occur in the heart and nervous system, and these can be serious.

Where you see signs on your skin: If you were in Europe when bit by a tick, you may see changes to your skin in this late stage. These changes usually appear on a hand or foot. Some people develop this change on both of their hands or feet. It can also occur on a knee, elbow, or elsewhere.

What the skin looks like: The skin begins to swell, and you may notice some redness. These signs are caused by having a bacterial infection for a long time. The affected skin may also feel sore.

In time, the skin starts to harden and shrink, causing deep lines to form. If you have hair in the area, it tends to fall out. The sweat glands can die, and the skin often becomes so thin that it tears easily. The medical name for this condition is acrodermatitischronical atrophicans.

In stage 3, you may also see tumors on your skin. It is believed that the long-term infection and swelling in the lymph nodes can lead to a cancer known as cutaneous B-cell lymphoma.

Skin starts to harden and shrink, causing deep lines to form

The medical name for this condition is acrodermatitis chronical atrophicans. Swelling, hardened skin, and deep lines on the foot of someone who has had Lyme disease for years.

When you see signs of changing skin and symptoms: These tend to occur months or years after you are bitten by a tick.

  • Arthritis

  • Dementia

  • Heart failure

Ticks Can Be Disease Carriers

The greatest threat to your health is not from the ticks themselves, but the blood-borne diseases they carry and transmit. Some tick species are know carriers of disease such a tick typhus and Lyme disease.

If a tick bites a person who is already infected with some type of blood-borne disease, then the disease can be easily transferred to the next host the tick attaches to.

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How Is Lyme Disease Treated

With early-stage Lyme disease, youâll take antibiotics for about 10 days to 3 weeks. The most common ones are amoxicillin, cefuroxime, and doxycycline. The antibiotics will almost always cure your infection. If they donât, you might get other antibiotics either by mouth or as a shot.

If you donât treat your Lyme infection, you might need oral antibiotics for symptoms like weakened face muscles and irregular heartbeat. You may need antibiotics if you have meningitis, inflammation in your brain and spinal cord, or more severe heart problems.

If your Lyme is late stage, the doctor might give you antibiotics either by mouth or as a shot. If it causes arthritis, youâll get arthritis treatment.

Thereâs no therapy for post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.

Lyme Disease Symptoms Are Wide

What are the Symptoms of Lyme disease?

Lyme disease can mimic hundreds of other conditions since its symptoms mirror many medical problems such as multiple sclerosis, arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome or lupus, and is sometimes known as The Great Imitator because of this. for a more complete list of possible symptoms.

Symptoms can play a key role in diagnosing Lyme disease. Due to the lack of an accurate diagnostic test, many patients are diagnosed based on a combination symptoms and diagnostic testing. This makes it extremely important for patients to keep track of all the symptoms they experience, to share with their healthcare provider.

Lyme disease symptoms can vary based on stage of the disease and if other tick-borne infections are present and can change over time.

Symptoms in acute Lyme disease

Acute Lyme disease occurs days to weeks after the initial tick bite and infection, in which the bacteria have not yet spread from the site of infection in the skin.

The most common symptoms in acute Lyme disease are the ones people are most familiar with, because they are symptoms often shared with other illnesses however, its important to recognize that they could indicate Lyme, and you should see a Lyme-treating physician right away.

Symptoms in early disseminated Lyme disease

Early disseminated Lyme disease occurs days to months after infection, in which the bacteria have begun to spread. There is a wide range of possible symptoms at this stage, including:

Symptoms in late stage Lyme disease
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What Causes Lyme Disease In Humans

    A bacterium called a “spirochete” causes Lyme disease, a tick-borne disease. In the United States, the actual name of the bacteria is Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia mayonii. In Europe, the bacteria Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii also cause Lyme disease. Certain ticks frequently found on deer, particularly white-tailed deer, from various locations harbor the bacterium in their stomachs. Dr. Burgdorfer originally discovered the spiral-shaped bacterium in the gut of the ticks in the United States, hence the naming Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Lyme borreliosis is spread by these infected ticks when they bite the skin, which permits the transmission of the Borrelia spirochete through the skin to infect the body. So Lyme disease is a tick-borne disease. Lyme disease is not contagious from an affected person to someone else. Lyme disease can cause abnormalities in the skin, joints, heart, and nervous system. Borreliosis, a tick-borne disease, is an infectious disease that is reportable to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States.

    What Should You Do If You Find A Tick

    • Don’t touch the tick with your bare hand.

    • Use a pair of tweezers to remove the tick. Grab the tick firmly by its mouth or head as close to your skin as possible.

    • Pull up slowly and steadily without twisting until it lets go. Don’t squeeze the tick, and don’t use petroleum jelly, solvents, knives, or a lit match to kill the tick.

    • Save the tick. Place it in a plastic container or bag so it can be tested for disease, if needed.

    • Wash the bite area well with soap and water and put an antiseptic lotion or cream on the site.

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    Lyme Disease Is The Great Imitator

    Lyme disease is the great imitator’ of other types of diseases.

    Many people have been misdiagnosed as having either chronic fatigue syndrome , lupus, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, Parkinson’s disease, Lou Gehrig’s disease, or rheumatoid arthritis.

    Treatments for an incorrect diagnosis may give some short-term relief from some symptoms but do not fix the underlying problem. Also, it is likely that unnecessary pharmaceuticals will be prescribed.

    If a blood test is done in the early stages of the infection, the bacteria that causes Lyme disease may not be apparent yet. Because of this, antibiotics are often given immediately, especially when a rash is present.

    Often people who show a negative result will have another test after a few weeks to make sure the Borrelia burgdorferi is gone.

    What Are The Stages Of Lyme Infection

    Lyme Disease Symptoms In Humans

    There are three stages:

    • Early localized Lyme: Flu-like symptoms like fever, chills, headache, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, and a rash that looks like a bull’s-eye or is round and red and at least 2 inches long
    • Early disseminated Lyme: Flu-like symptoms like pain, weakness, or numbness in your arms and legs, changes in your vision, heart palpitations and chest pain, a rash , and a type of facial paralysis known as Bellâs palsy
    • Late disseminated Lyme: This can happen weeks, months, or years after the tick bite. Symptoms might include arthritis, severe fatigue and headaches, dizziness, trouble sleeping, and confusion.

    About 10% of people treated for Lyme infection donât shake the disease. They may go on to have three core symptoms: joint or muscle pain, fatigue, and short-term memory loss or confusion. This is called post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. It can be hard to diagnose because it has the same symptoms as other diseases. Plus, there isn’t a blood test to confirm it.

    Experts arenât sure why Lyme symptoms donât always go away. One theory is that your body keeps fighting the infection even after the bacteria are gone, like an autoimmune disorder.

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    Learn The Stages Of Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease occurs in three stages: early localized, early disseminated and late disseminated. However the stages can overlap and not all patients go through all three. A bulls-eye rash is usually considered one of the first signs of infection, but many people develop a different kind of rash or none at all. In most cases, Lyme symptoms can start with a flu-like illness. If untreated, the symptoms can continue to worsen and turn into a long-lived debilitating illness.

    Stage 1: Early Localized Disease

    Symptoms with early localized Lyme disease may begin hours, a few days or even weeks after a tick bite. At this point, the

    infection has not yet spread throughout the body. Lyme is the easiest to cure at this stage.

    Symptoms may include:

    • skin rash, which may or may not look like a bulls eye
    • flu-like illness, including chills and fever
    • fatigue
    • muscle soreness and joint pain
    • swollen lymph nodes
    • sore throat
    Stage 2: Early Disseminated Lyme

    Early disseminated Lyme may occur several weeks or months after the tick bite. Bacteria are beginning to spread throughout the body. In addition to flu-like symptoms, this stage is often characterized by increase in symptoms such as:

    • chills
    • pain, weakness or numbness in the arms, legs
    • vision changes
    • heart problems, such as palpitations, chest pain
    • rash may appear on body
    • facial paralysis
    Stage 3: Late Disseminated Lyme Disease

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    Symptoms Of Lyme Disease

    A circular or oval shape rash around a tick bite can be an early symptom of Lyme disease in some people.

    The rash can appear up to 3 months after being bitten by an infected tick, but usually appears within 1 to 4 weeks. It can last for several weeks.

    The rash can have a darker or lighter area in the centre and might gradually spread. It’s not usually hot or itchy.

    The rash may be flat, or slightly raised, and look pink, red, or purple when it appears on white skin. It can be harder to see the rash on brown and black skin and it may look like a bruise.

    Some people also get flu-like symptoms a few days or weeks after they were bitten by an infected tick, such as:

    • a high temperature, or feeling hot and shivery
    • headache
    • tiredness and loss of energy

    Some people with Lyme disease develop more severe symptoms months or years later.

    This is more likely if treatment is delayed.

    These more severe symptoms may include:

    • pain and swelling in joints
    • nerve problems such as pain or numbness
    • heart problems
    • trouble with memory or concentration

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    What Are The Complications Of Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease affects people differently. Relapse and incomplete treatment responses happen. Relapse and incomplete treatment responses happen. Complications of untreated early-stage disease include:

    • Joint disease

    • Frequent hospitalizations to manage the disease

    Some of these complications result in chronic, debilitating conditions.

    Some people may develop post-Lyme disease syndrome . A condition also known as chronic Lyme disease includes PLDS, but also other syndromes. Usually, these are characterized by persistent musculoskeletal and peripheral nerve pain, fatigue, and memory impairment.

    Are Some Locations More At Risk Than Others

    Ignore Lyme Disease Symptoms and You Could Risk Severe Complications ...

    Yes and no. There are areas in which the bacteria is endemic meaning the disease is established and present more or less continually in that community.

    In Canada, blacklegged tick populations have been confirmed or are growing in the following areas:

    • Southern British Columbia.
    • Southern New Brunswick and Grand Manan Island.
    • South shore and northern mainland Nova Scotia.

    However, it is important to note that ticks can be spread by birds, in particular songbirds that feed off the forest floor. Because these birds are migratory, there is the potential for new populations of the bacteria to spread across the country. This fact means that you do not have to be in an endemic or high-risk area to be at risk of contacting ticks and the disease.

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    What Is Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. B. burgdorferi is transmitted to humans by a bite from an infected black-legged or deer tick. The tick becomes infected after feeding on infected deer, birds, or mice.

    A tick has to be present on the skin for at least 36 hours to transmit the infection. Many people with Lyme disease have no memory of a tick bite.

    Lyme disease was first recognized in the town of Old Lyme, Connecticut, in 1975. Its the most common tickborne illness in Europe and the United States.

    People who live or spend time in wooded areas known for transmission of the disease are more likely to get this illness. People with domesticated animals that visit wooded areas also have a higher risk of getting Lyme disease.

    Stage : Later Symptoms

    • shooting pains, numbness or tingling in the hands or feet
    • heart palpitations

    These symptoms may go away without treatment within a few weeks or months. However, some people develop chronic Lyme disease and have lasting symptoms.

    Around of people who do not receive treatment for the disease develop recurrent episodes of arthritis with severe swelling, especially in the large joints.

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    What Should I Do If I Am Bitten By A Tick

    If you experience a tick bite, the best way to remove it is by taking the following steps:

    • Tug gently but firmly with blunt tweezers near the “head” of the tick at the level of your skin until it releases its hold on the skin.
    • Avoid crushing the tick’s body or handling the tick with bare fingers as you could exposure yourself to the bacteria in the tick.
    • Wash the bite area thoroughly with soap and water.
    • DO NOT use kerosene, petroleum jelly , or hot cigarette butts to remove the tick.
    • DO NOT squeeze the tick’s body with your fingers or tweezers.

    Is Lyme Disease Curable What Is The Prognosis Of Lyme Disease

    Symptoms of Lyme Disease can seem similar to those of COVID-19

      Lyme disease is usually curable with antibiotics. This is so true that some authors of Lyme disease research have stated that the most common cause of lack of response of Lyme disease to antibiotic therapy is a lack of Lyme disease, to begin with! The type of antibiotic depends on the stage of the disease and what areas of the body are affected. Early illness is usually effectively treated with medications taken by mouth, for example, doxycycline , amoxicillin , or cefuroxime axetil . This antibiotic therapy generally results in a rapid cure of Lyme disease. Of note, doxycycline should not be used in pregnancy or children under 8 years of age.

      Therefore, if a person finds a typical bulls-eye skin rash developing in an area of a tick bite, they should seek medical attention as soon as possible. Generally, antibiotic treatment resolves the rash within one or two weeks with no long-term consequences. Later illnesses such as nervous-system disease might require intravenous drugs examples are ceftriaxone and penicillin G. There are no home remedies to treat Lyme disease.

      In those people with two or more episodes of erythema migrans rash, even years apart, it is felt that the episodes represent different infections or reinfection rather than persistence of the original infection.

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      Stage : Early Localized Disease

      Symptoms of Lyme disease usually start 1 to 2 weeks after the tick bite. One of the earliest signs of the disease is a bulls-eye rash.

      The rash occurs at the site of the tick bite, usually, but not always, as a central red spot surrounded by a clear spot with an area of redness at the edge. It may be warm to the touch, but it isnt painful and doesnt itch. This rash will gradually fade in most people.

      The formal name for this rash is erythema migrans. Erythema migrans is said to be characteristic of Lyme disease. However, many people dont have this symptom.

      Some people have a rash thats solid red, while people with dark complexions may have a rash that resembles a bruise.

      The rash can occur with or without systemic viral or flu-like symptoms.

      Other symptoms commonly seen in this stage of Lyme disease include:

      What Are Risk Factors For Developing Lyme Disease

      Lyme disease occurs most frequently in children 5-14 years of age and adults 40-50 years of age. The most substantial risk factor for Lyme disease is

      • exposure to the ticks located in the high-risk areas of the country listed above,
      • particularly in the New England states,
      • as well as Minnesota and Wisconsin.

      Additional risk factors include recreational and occupational exposure to ticks and outdoor activities, including

      • gardening, in woods, and
      • fields in the high-risk areas.

      No transplacental transmission of Lyme disease from the mother to the unborn child has ever been described. Again, Lyme disease is not contagious from one person to another.

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